Dreadlocks reflect a lifestyle.
They are a commitment.
They are art.
They are unkempt, wild, beautiful, and natural.
SUBMIT YOURS ☮

Saturday 21st April

Wednesday 28th March

somossopa:

Ancient Peruvian skull with locked hair. 
“There have been ascetic groups within a variety of world faiths that have at times worn similarly matted hair. In addition to the Nazirites of Judaism and the sadhus of Hinduism, it is worn among some sects of Sufi Islam, notably the Baye Fall sect of Mourides and by some Ethiopian Orthodox monks in Christianity, among others. Some of the very earliest Christians may also have worn this hairstyle; particularly noteworthy are descriptions of James the Just, “brother of Jesus” and first Bishop of Jerusalem, whom Hegesippus (according to Eusebius and Jerome) described as a Nazirite who never once cut his hair.In ancient Egypt examples of Egyptians wearing locked hairstyles and wigs have appeared on bas-reliefs, statuary and other artifacts. Mummified remains of ancient Egyptians with locks, as well as locked wigs, have also been recovered from archaeological sites.  The Hindu deity Shiva and his followers were described in the scriptures as wearing “jaTaa”, meaning “twisted locks of hair”, probably derived from the Dravidian word “Sadai”, which means to twist or to wrap. The Greeks, the Pacific Ocean peoples and the Naga people have at times worn their hair in locks.
Pre-Columbian Aztec priests were described in Aztec codices (including the Durán Codex, the Codex Tudela and the Codex Mendoza) as wearing their hair untouched, allowing it to grow long and matted.”

somossopa:

Ancient Peruvian skull with locked hair. 

“There have been ascetic groups within a variety of world faiths that have at times worn similarly matted hair. In addition to the Nazirites of Judaism and the sadhus of Hinduism, it is worn among some sects of Sufi Islam, notably the Baye Fall sect of Mourides and by some Ethiopian Orthodox monks in Christianity, among others. Some of the very earliest Christians may also have worn this hairstyle; particularly noteworthy are descriptions of James the Just, “brother of Jesus” and first Bishop of Jerusalem, whom Hegesippus (according to Eusebius and Jerome) described as a Nazirite who never once cut his hair.

In ancient Egypt examples of Egyptians wearing locked hairstyles and wigs have appeared on bas-reliefs, statuary and other artifacts. Mummified remains of ancient Egyptians with locks, as well as locked wigs, have also been recovered from archaeological sites.

  The Hindu deity Shiva and his followers were described in the scriptures as wearing “jaTaa”, meaning “twisted locks of hair”, probably derived from the Dravidian word “Sadai”, which means to twist or to wrap. The Greeks, the Pacific Ocean peoples and the Naga people have at times worn their hair in locks.

Pre-Columbian Aztec priests were described in Aztec codices (including the Durán Codex, the Codex Tudela and the Codex Mendoza) as wearing their hair untouched, allowing it to grow long and matted.”